1. House S in Vorderweissenbach by HPSA | Posted by CJWHO.com
    House S in Vorderweissenbach by HPSA | Posted by CJWHO.com
    House S in Vorderweissenbach by HPSA | Posted by CJWHO.com
    House S in Vorderweissenbach by HPSA | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    House S in Vorderweissenbach, Austria by HPSA | via

    HPSA created ‘House S’ on a steep, rather small plot of land with excellent views. The owners required a cost efficient house with a maximum of 130 m², of living space. A basement was not necessary so that the architects based the whole building on pillars.

    The U-shaped floor plan responds to the neighbouring settlement. Living rooms and bedrooms are oriented to a terrace that offers great views of the surrounding hills. Because of the chosen typology the natural terrain could be untouched over the whole plot. In the garden the building offers a large, weather-protected area.

    CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

     
  2. A House in a Church by Ruud Visser Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    A House in a Church by Ruud Visser Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    A House in a Church by Ruud Visser Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    A House in a Church by Ruud Visser Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    A House in a Church by Ruud Visser Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    A House in a Church by Ruud Visser Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    A House in a Church by Ruud Visser Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    A House in a Church, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. by Ruud Visser Architects | via

    On the river in Rotterdam, is a wooden church from 1930. The building has not functioned as a church since the 1960s, and had been used as a storage space and garage. The church was completely covered with aluminum sheeting and transformed into a storage company. Until a family with two children, bought the church in order to live.

    Instead of simply transforming the church into a house with 12 bedrooms, we have a ‘normal’ house created as a separate object placed in the church. You can truly walk around the house while you are ‘in’ the church. The last aisle of the church, the transept is completely open. The front and side, allowed practical use, as much as possible to its original state.

    On the back-side of the original church was the choir. A smaller and lower volume than the actual church. With its back facade directly situated on the bank of the river De Rotte. The original volume of the choir is replaced by a modern volume, with the same measurements but much shorter and with the back facade completely out of glass. The formerly ‘transept’ of the church (cross-ship) is laid open now. And is designed as an immense void, where the whole original church can be seen. The new glass-façade opens the church to the river and gives a magnificent view off the landscape. The transept now functions as a buffer between the outside and the private house.

    Photography: Rene de Wit

    CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

     
  3. designed-for-life:

    Casa VU / TDC

    The project is set on a cliff with a steep slope and a privileged view to an isle on the sea. Every room tends to open up to this natural surrounding through overlapped volumetries which generate shadows and open spaces such as the terrace which ends up becoming a contemplation space.

     
  4. House In Leiria by Aires Mateus | Posted by CJWHO.com
    House In Leiria by Aires Mateus | Posted by CJWHO.com
    House In Leiria by Aires Mateus | Posted by CJWHO.com
    House In Leiria by Aires Mateus | Posted by CJWHO.com
    House In Leiria by Aires Mateus | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    House In Leiria, Portugal by Aires Mateus

    he house is a recognizable archetype emptied of its centre by the light designed by a three heighted courtyard that opens horizontally at the garden level. The bedroom courtyards, revealed in the garden, relate with this archetypal object providing different readings on its scale. Scale and volume are controlled in a chaotic context, with a clear identity that from its core relates with the historical legacy far away: the Leiria Castle.

    Photography: FG +SG

    CJWHO:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

     
  5. Guesthouse by Bromley Caldari Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Guesthouse by Bromley Caldari Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Guesthouse by Bromley Caldari Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Guesthouse by Bromley Caldari Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    Guesthouse by Bromley Caldari Architects

    "Who says beach homes need to be cramped-but-cozy shrines to wicker? When our client bought this property, it was a bit outdated. We opened up the floor plan and blended the indoor and outdoor spaces to lend the house a breezy, simple elegance."

    CJWHO:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

     
  6. Fall House in Big Sur, California by Fougeron Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Fall House in Big Sur, California by Fougeron Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Fall House in Big Sur, California by Fougeron Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Fall House in Big Sur, California by Fougeron Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Fall House in Big Sur, California by Fougeron Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Fall House in Big Sur, California by Fougeron Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Fall House in Big Sur, California by Fougeron Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Fall House in Big Sur, California by Fougeron Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    Fall House in Big Sur, California by Fougeron Architecture

    Set in a rough, yet spectacular landscape, with a neighboring 250-foot drop to the Pacific Ocean, Fall House by Fougeron Architecture is a one-of-a-kind vacation retreat:

    “The long, thin volume of the house conforms to the natural contours of the land and the geometries of the bluff, deforming its shape and structure in response. In this way, the complex structural system applies natural forms to accommodate the siting. The main bearing system of the house is set back twelve feet from the bluff, both to protect the cliff’s delicate ecosystem and to ensure the structure’s integrity and safety”.

    CJWHO:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

     
  7. Modern Town House in London with a Lovely Brick Exterior by Moxon Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Modern Town House in London with a Lovely Brick Exterior by Moxon Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Modern Town House in London with a Lovely Brick Exterior by Moxon Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    Modern Town House in London with a Lovely Brick Exterior by Moxon Architects

    London-based studio Moxon Architects designed the conversion of the Chelsea Town House situated in Chelsea, Southwest London, England.
    The existing house was radically reconfigured to provide larger rooms while following the materials of the previous structure. The double height limed oak staircase is works as a library with a space for writing and concealed compartments for storage.

    Photography: Simon Kennedy

    CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

     
  8. AV Houses by Corsi Hirano Arquitetos | Posted by CJWHO.com
    AV Houses by Corsi Hirano Arquitetos | Posted by CJWHO.com
    AV Houses by Corsi Hirano Arquitetos | Posted by CJWHO.com
    AV Houses by Corsi Hirano Arquitetos | Posted by CJWHO.com
    AV Houses by Corsi Hirano Arquitetos | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    AV Houses, São Paulo, Brazil by Corsi Hirano Arquitetos

    The line of the roof extends out over the extruded glass-fronted boxes that house the staircases, creating shelters over the entrances. Half the residences have these stairs at the front and half have them at the rear. Each home has an open-plan living space on the ground floor with two bedrooms and a bathroom upstairs, plus a small garden and an extra shower room out the back.

    CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

     
  9. Marcelo Rios House by Gonzalo Mardones Viviani | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Marcelo Rios House by Gonzalo Mardones Viviani | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Marcelo Rios House by Gonzalo Mardones Viviani | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Marcelo Rios House by Gonzalo Mardones Viviani | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    Marcelo Rios House by Gonzalo Mardones Viviani

    Situated in the foothills of Santiago de Chile, the Marcelo Rios House, with its magical views of the hills and a golf course, was built by Gonzalo Mardones Viviani for a former tennis player. Working with the slope the structure sits on, the house is partially buried to respect and see the views of the scenery from the home’s access road.

    CJWHO:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

     
  10.  
  11. AIBS / Atelier d’Architecture Bruno Erpicum & Partners | Posted by CJWHO.com
    AIBS / Atelier d’Architecture Bruno Erpicum & Partners | Posted by CJWHO.com
    AIBS / Atelier d’Architecture Bruno Erpicum & Partners | Posted by CJWHO.com
    AIBS / Atelier d’Architecture Bruno Erpicum & Partners | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    AIBS, Spain | Atelier d’Architecture Bruno Erpicum & Partners

    From the architect. Just like a path or road which comes to a dead end, the land becomes rippled before turning into a staircase which leads you down to the lower bridge from where you can appreciate the landscape in all its beauty.

    The living areas are enclosed by a single large window frame. The windows also provide protection against the winds. There are also large windows along the patio which is in an enclosed area. The cliff which has an olive tree on top provides a second wall for the patio. Away from view, the swimming pool lies to the side of the building beyond the terrace, surrounded by the natural environment.

    Photography: Jean-Luc Laloux

    CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

     
  12.  
  13. Striking backyard oasis in The Netherlands | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Striking backyard oasis in The Netherlands | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Striking backyard oasis in The Netherlands | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Striking backyard oasis in The Netherlands | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Striking backyard oasis in The Netherlands | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    Striking backyard oasis in The Netherlands

    Dream garden on the coast is a contemporary project by Eric Kant, an international operating design studio specializing in high-end interiors and wellness projects in The Netherlands. The scope of this project was to design an outdoor living space for a modern coastal villa comprised of a private garden with an outdoor pool and water feature, sauna, hot tub and a lounge area with a fireplace. Indoor and outdoor living flow seamlessly into one another, creating the perfect outdoor oasis for the homeowner.

    CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

     
  14. Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten | Posted by CJWHO.com
    Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten | Posted by CJWHO.com

    cjwho:

    Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

    Steel trees with sprawling branches support the glass roof of this greenhouse in Switzerland by Buehrer Wuest Architekten. Located in a botanical garden outside the village of Grüningen, the greenhouse is used for growing subtropical plants such as banana and papaya. The architects borrowed structural patterns found in nature, like the membranes of a leaf, to create the geometric structure of the roof.

    CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

     
  15. thekhooll:

    Hidden Valley Residence

    The building form designed by by Marmol Radziner Architectureconsists of three main branches that cantilever out over a landscape of sandstone ledge. Deep covered decks provide shading, frame views, and link to a guesthouse and exercise space.

    (via designed-for-life)